Eugenius Wilson Davis  ‎(I31187)‎
Name:
Eugenius Wilson Davis

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 20 December 1832 23 20 Marion, Monongahela, West Virginia, USA
Death: 22 April 1925 ‎(Age 92)‎ LaPorte, Indiana

Personal Facts and Details
Birth 20 December 1832 23 20 Marion, Monongahela, West Virginia, USA

Marriage Betsey Ann Barnes - 9 October 1853 ‎(Age 20)‎
Death 22 April 1925 ‎(Age 92)‎ LaPorte, Indiana

View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F969)
Caleb B. Davis
1809 - 1891
Sarah Wagner
1812 - 1888
Alpheus W. Davis
1832 -
Benjamin F. Davis
1834 -
Caleb B. Davis
1836 -
Hattie E. Davis
1838 - 1903
Jacob J. Davis
1840 -
Josephus Davis
1842 -
Sarah E. Davis
1844 -
Eugenius Wilson Davis
1832 - 1925

Immediate Family  (F13485)
Betsey Ann Barnes
1835 - 1919
Arthur C. Davis
1854 - 1896
Frances E. Davis
1862 -


Notes

Shared Note
preconversiondata
Davis, Eugenius Wilson
July 11, 2004 09:28AM Registered: 4 years ago
Posts: 89,841

1880 History of LaPorte County, Chapman, Page 700
Eugene W. Davis was born in Monongahela county, W. Va., Dec. 20, 1832. His father, Caleb,
and his mother, Sarah ‎(Wagner)‎ Davis, were also natives of Virginia, the former of English and
the latter of German descent, who came to this county in 1831, first, looking at the country, and
in 1833 moved and settled on the Phineas Hunt place, in Kankakee tp., where they resided
until about 1835, when they moved to Springfield tp., and built a saw-mill on sec. 25. In 1838
they came to this tp. and settled on sec. 30, where they resided until 1879, when they moved
to Shelby, Mich., at which place they now reside. Father Davis is widely known throughout this
county, having preached the gospel for many years, without taking pay for his services. He
labored without money or price, doing great good to his fellow man. He occasionally preaches
where he now resides. Eugene was reared on the farm, and received a limited education,
though at present he is a well-read man, getting his knowledge by his own personal efforts
since he became of age. He has at present one of the best private libraries in the township, if
not in the county. He commenced in life without a cent. He earned his first $100 by cutting cord
wood at 40 cents per cord, gaining little by little, until now he is the owner of 200 acres of
well-improved land. He resides on sec. 29. He married Miss B.A. Barnes Oct. 9, 1853: she is
the daughter of Cyrus Barnes, who is also an old settler. Miss B. was born in New York in
1835. They have had 3 children, 2 of whom are living; Arthur C. and Frances E. ‎(now Mrs.
Finley.)‎ In addition to his large library Mr. Davis has also a very fine collection of geological
specimens, which attracts the admiration of all visitors. P.O., Hatch's Mills.
Eugenius Wilson Davis, 92 years old, ex-president of the LaPorte Savings band and prominent
retired farmer of Galena township, died at his home at 3 a.m. today after an illness of only two
hours. Neuralgia of the heart was the cause of Mr. Davis' death, Dr. O.L. Sutherland , his physician,
said. Mr. Davis , who played a prominent part in the life and development of LaPorte county,
became president of the bank in February, 1915, upon the death of James H. Buck. Until May,
1919, he served as head of the institution, retiring at that time and returning to his farm in
Galena township. He was connected with the bank for 38 years and was the oldest continuous resident of the county, having come here from West Virginia at the age of 1 year.
Funeral Saturday
Funeral services for Mr. Davis will be held at the home at 11 a.m. Saturday. The ministers in
charge probably will be the Rev.M.G. Long of LaPorte and the Rev. J.F. Bellville of Rolling
Prairie. Burial will be at Pine Lake cemetery. L.A. Decker is the undertaker. Mr.Davis was born in Monongalia county, West Virginia, on Dec.26 1832. His paternal grandfather John Davis, was likewise a nativeof West Virginia and a farmer. Caleb B. Davis, the father of the deceased man, came to LaPorte on horseback.
Went to Log School
Mr. Davis' education was acquired in a log school house, and he was only able to attend
school through the winter months, for in the summer seasons he assisted his father in clearing
the land and improving the home farm. He was thus engaged until he became 17 when, having formed a strong desire to enjoy better educational privileges, He began educating himself, through reading and study at home. He became qualified for teaching, and for several years followed the profession. When he started out for himself he bought 80 acres in Galena township for which he incurred a indebtedness of $700. He had no teams, there were no buildings on the place, or orchard and no tools of any description. He left his father's house at noon on a May day in 1854, and cut every log used in building his first cabin that afternoon. He always carried on agriculture until his retirement. Early in life he practiced economy, industry and perseverance, and these sterling traits of character enabled him to advance steadily upon the road of prosperity. At the time of his death he owned several hundred acres in Galena township.
Was State Senator
Mr. Davis was always known as a Democrat and in 1881 he was lected to the state legislature
and re-elected to the state legislature in the upper house. To every question which came up
for settlement he gave his careful and earnest consideration, and his was a loyal support to all
measures which he believed would contribute to the general good. He also filled some local offices, including that of justice of the peace, and he was always recognized as a prominent and valued citizen of his community. By some he was called "the grand old man of LaPorte county."
Since 1865 he had been a prominent Mason and at the time of his death held membership in
Excelsior Lodge No. 41, F& A.M, of LaPorte, and filled every chair except that of tyler. A
member and elder of the Christian church, he was a regular attendant and teacher in the
Sunday school for many years. On Oct. 9, 1853 he married Miss Betsey Ann Barnes. She passed away on Dec. 21, 1919. He married the present Mrs. Davis on Oct.25, 1921. She survives with one daughter, Fannie Codwallader, 11 grandchildren and several great grandchildren. Othie Way, president of the LaPorte Savings band, who succeeded Mr. Davis, said that he was a man of firm judgment and that many persons sought opinions from him.
The Acorn, Three Oaks, MI; Apr. 30, 1925 Eugenius Davis Passes Away Resident of Galena Township For 91 Years. Well Known In Three Oaks. Eugenius W. Davis, 92 years old, ex-president of the LaPorte Savings bank and prominent retired farmer of Galena township, died at his home at 3 A. M. today after an illness of only two hours. Neuralgia of the heart was the cause of Mr. Davis’ death, Dr. O. L. Sutherland, his physician, said. Mr. Davis, who played a prominent part in the life and development of LaPorte County, became president of the bank in February, 1915, upon the death of James H. Buck. Until May 1919, he served as head of the institution, retiring at that time and returning to his farm in Galena Township. He was connected with the bank for 38 years and was the oldest continuous resident of the county, having come here from West Virginia at the age of 1 year. Funeral Saturday Funeral services for Mr. Davis will be held at the home at 11 A. M. Saturday. The ministers in charge probably will be the Rev. M. G. Long of LaPorte and Rev. J. F. Bellville of Rolling Prairie. Burial will be at Pine Lake Cemetery. Mr. Davis was born in Monongalia County, West Virginia, on December 26, 1832. His paternal grandfather, John Davis, was likewise a native of West Virginia and a farmer. Caleb B. Davis, father of the deceased man, came to LaPorte on horseback. Went To Log School Mr. Davis’ education was acquired in a log schoolhouse, and he was only able to attend school through the winter months, for in the summer seasons he assisted his father in clearing the land and improving the home farm. He was thus engaged until he became 17 when, having formed a strong desire to enjoy better education privileges. He began educating himself through reading and study at home. He became qualified for teaching and for several years following the profession. When he started out for himself he bought 80 acres in Galena Township for which he incurred an indebtedness of $700. He had no teams, there were no buildings on the place, or orchard and no tools of any description. He left his father’s house at noon on a May day in 1854, and cut every log used in building his first cabin that afternoon. He always carried on agriculture until his retirement. Early in life he practiced economy, industry, and perseverance, and these sterling traits of character enabled him to advance steadily upon the road of prosperity. As the time of his death he owned several hundred acres in Galena Township. Was State Sentor Mr. Davis was always known as a Democrat and in 1881 he was elected to the state legislature and re-elected to the state legislature in the upper house. To every question which came up for settlement he gave his careful and earnest consideration, and his was a loyal support to all measures which he believed would contribute to the general good. He also filled some local offices, including that of Justice of the Peace, and he was always recognized as a prominent and valued citizen of his community. By some he was called “the grand old man of LaPorte County.”
Since 1865 he had been a prominent Mason and at the time of his death held membership in Excelsior Lodge No. 41, F. & A. M., of LaPorte, and filled every chair except that of tyler. A member and elder of the Christian Church, he was a regular attendant and teacher in the Sunday School for many years. On October 9, 1853 he married Miss Betsey Barnes. She passed away on December 21,
1919. He married the present Mrs. Davis on October 25, 1921. She survives with one daughter
Fannie Cadwallader, 11 grandchildren and several great grandchildren. Othie Way, president of the LaPorte Savings bank, who succeeded Mr. Davis, said that he was a man of firm judgement and that many persons sought opnions from him. -The LaPorte Daily Herald-Argus, April 22, 1925.
BIOGRAPHY:
A Twentieth Century History and Biographical Record of LaPorte County, IN, Rev. E. D. Daniels, 47 Hon. Eugenius W. Davis. No history of LaPorte county would be complete without mention of the Hon. Eugenius W. Davis, who for many years has resided within its borders and has played an important part in its development and progress. He has been active in public affairs, representing his district in the state legislature, and has left the impress of his individuality upon local advancement. His life, too, in a business was has been an eminently useful and successful one, and although he started out empty handed he has steadily worked his way upward and is today one of the prosperous agriculturists of this portion of the state, his home being on section 29, Galena township. Mr. Davis was born in Monongalia county, West Virginia, on the 20th of December, 1832. His paternal grandfather, John Davis, was likewise a farmer. He died in the place of his nativity when about sixty years of age. There were five brothers who made their was across the mountains by way of Harper's Ferry through Maryland, and all served as soldiers of the Revolutionary war, being valiant defenders of the rights of the colonists. The family is of either Welsh or English lineage. Caleb B. Davis, the father of Eugenius W. Davis, was born in Monongalia county, West Virginia, in 1809, and there obtained his education. In 1831 he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Wagner, also a native of Monongalia county, her birth occurring on the 15th of April, 1812. Her father, Jacob J. Wagner, was born in Pennsylvania and came to LaPorte county in pioneer times. He purchased land in 1831 and took up his abode thereon in 1835. The Wagners were of German lineage, the grandfather of Sarah Wagner having been Caspar Wagner, who was born in Germany and sailed from that country to Pennsylvania. Jacob J. Wagner was the youngest of twelve children, and in his youth was bound out to learn the tanner's trade. He could not speak a word in English until he was twelve years of age, by the soon mastered the language, and by his industry and perseverance in his business career won success. As time advanced he made judicious investments in real estate, and became the owner of seventeen hundred and sixty acres of valuable land in LaPorte and adjoining counties. He also engaged extensively in loaning money and his business operations were of an important nature. He was truly a self-made man, own exertions. He was also well read, and kept informed on all subjects of general information. As a very prominent pioneer settler of LaPorte county he deserves mention in this work and his efforts were of marked value in advancing public improvement and progress. In the year of his marriage Caleb B. Davis came to Indiana on horseback, intending to locate in the central part of the state, but he did not like that district and continued on to LaPorte county, which was known as the lake region. He then returned to Virginia, but in 1833 again came to LaPorte county, this time accompanied by his family. The journey was made with a team and covered wagon, and he reached Kankakee township on the 10th of September, 1833. There he lived for one year upon land belonging to his father-in-law, now known as J. J. Wagner place, and later removed to his own farm in the same township, where he entered on hundred and twenty acres of land. The following years he built a sawmill, and in addition to agricultural pursuits engaged in the manufacture of lumber. In February, 1838, he traded his mill for two hundred acres of wild land in sections 29 and 20, Galena township, and, removing to this farm, made it his home for forty-one years. In 1879 he removed to Michigan, where he spent his last days, his death occurring in 1891, when he had reached his eighty-third year. From 1842 up to the time of his death, covering a period of fifty years he was a preacher of the Christian or New Light church. Honorable principles and the true spirit of Christianity permeated his entire life and made him a man whom to know was to respect and honor. In politics he was a life-long Democrat and took an active part in political affairs, serving as trustee and as justice of the peace. His wife lived to be seventy-six years of age and passed away in Michigan in 1888. In their family were ten children, of whom two died in infancy, while eight reached mature years and are still living, namely: Eugenius W.; Josephus, who is a practicing physician of New Carlisle, Indiana; Alpheus W., a retired farmer living in Three Oaks, Michigan; Caleb, a resident of Mears, Michigan; Jacob J., who is living in Fremont, Newaygo county, of the same state; Sarah E., the wife of Thomas Evans, who resides news Stockton, California; Hattie E., the late wife of William Beals, of Rolling Prairie, Indiana, and who died October 21, 1903. Eugenius W. Davis was less than one year old when his parents came to LaPorte county, and his memory forms a connecting link between, the pioneer past and the progressive present with its splendid improvements and opportunities. In his splendid life, however, advantages were much more meager. His education was acquired in the log schoolhouse, and he was only able to attend school through the winter months, for in the summer seasons he assisted his father in clearing the lank and improving the home farm. He was thus engaged until he became seventeen years of age, when, having formed a strong desire to enjoy better educational privileges, he began educating himself through reading and study at home. Thus he became qualified for teaching, and for several years followed that profession with excellent success. He now has a teachers' certificate received from the first one authorized to grant such a document in the county, by he chose to devote his attention to agricultural pursuits. However, he taught in the winter months for about ten years, and in the winter of 1852-3 his school was held in a log building. When he started out for himself he bought eighty acres of land in Galena township, for which he incurred and indebtedness of seven hundred dollars. He had no teams, there were no buildings upon the place, no orchard and no tools of any description. He left his father's home at noon on a May day in 1854, and cut every log used in building his first cabin in that afternoon. In that pioneer home he remained from the 2d of June, 1854 until the 22d of October, 1862, when he removed into the house he now occupies. He has always carried improved farm well supplied with modern farm implements and tools of any description needed upon his place. He has also erected good buildings, placed his fields under a high state of cultivation, and does not owe a dollar upon his farm. Early in life he practiced economy, industry and perseverance, and these sterling traits of character have enabled him to advance steadily upon the farms, on consisting of two hundred and twenty acres, and the other, about a mile distant on section 19, Galena township, comprising two hundred and forty acres, so that his landed possessions aggregate four hundred and sixty acres, all of which is valuable and well improved. He has, however, not confined his activities entirely to agricultural work, for he is now the vice president of the LaPorte Savings Bank, and has often been called upon to settle up estates and look after other business of a public nature. Mr. Davis has always been known as a Democrat and in 1881 was elected to the state legislature and re-elected in 1883, serving for four years. To every question which came up for settlement he gave his careful and earnest consideration, and his was a loyal support to all measures which he believed would contribute to the general good. He has also filled some local offices, including that of justice of the peace, and he has long been organized as a prominent and valued citizen of his community. Since 1865 he has been a prominent Mason, and now holds membership in Excelsior Lodge No. 41, F. & A. M., of LaPorte, and filled every chair except that of tyler. A member and elder of the Christian church, he has been a regular teacher in its Sunday-school for many years. He is deeply interested in everything that tends to promote its growth and extend it influence. On the 9th of October, 1853, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Miss Betsey Barnes, who was born in Onondaga county, New York, January 30, 1835. Her father, Cyrus Barnes, was born April 11, 1808, in Onondaga county, was there reared, and in the year 1826 was married there to Eliza Elliott, who was likewise a native of that district. She was born April 23, 1809, and they took up their abode in Onondaga county, New York, where they remained until the spring of 1839, when they came to LaPorte county and settled in Galena township. There Mr. Barnes carried on general farming until his death, which occurred in 1883, while his wife survived him until 1887. They lived in one house in Galena township for exactly forty-four years. Of their eight children, one died in infancy while the other reached adult age. The father was a farmer and also pioneer nurseryman of northwestern Indiana, and all of the orchards for miles around were planted with trees from his place and many were grafted by him. Phineas Barnes, the grandfather of Mrs. Davis, was united in marriage to Lois Foster, who was born in New York and their passed away. The grandparents on the maternal line were John and Hannah Elliott, the former born June 6, 1777, and the latter on the 17th of February, 1780. They were natives of New York, and were of English lineage, while the Barnes family was of Irish descent. The children of Cyrus and Eliza Barnes were as follows: Avery I., who is a resident of Galena township; Lois D., the wife of V. F. Smith, who died in 1864; Hannah, who died in 1834; James A., who is editor of the Auburn Courier, a daily and weekly paper published in DeKalb county, Indiana; Betsey A.; Charles O., who is a farmer of Galena township; and Lydia who was a teacher and died in 1864. Dr. C. G. Barnes, another member of the family, is a resident physician in Nebraska and was a pioneer settler of Boone county, that state. He served on the staff of Governor Poynter, as colonel and surgeon general and is very prominent in political circles. He is one of the pioneers of Boone county, Nebraska, and a leading and influential citizen there. Mrs. Davis, the fifth child of this family, came to LaPorte county in the spring of 1839, when a little maiden of only four summers. She was educated in the schools of Galena township, the little temple of learning being a log structure. She never went for one day to a frame school. In 1863 she joined the New Light Church, and in 1870 became a member of the Disciples church, of which she is still an adherent. She has been a very active and earnest worker in the church many years. She possesses considerable literary of which displays considerable merit. She has also been the correspondent for many papers, and in 1850 published her first article, which appeared in the Genesee Farmer, of Rochester, New York, of which Joseph Harris was the editor. Since that time she has contributed to many papers, and is now writing for five different journals. Her poems have been published in the papers of Indianapolis and of Illinois, and she has received some very flattering notices from the press. Another side of her nature is manifested only raises fine flowers, but also produces excellent fruit, and is a member of the Indiana State Horticultural Society. She has taken many first premiums in that society because of the excellent fruit which she has displayed and she is also a member of the American Foresters' Association. To Mr. and Mrs. Davis have been born three children, of whom one died in infancy. The others are Arthur C. and Fannie E. The former was born December 31, 1854, and on January 23, 1896, was killed by the bursting of a balance wheel on a wood-sawing machine. He married Hannah D. Maass on the 1st of January, 1881, and they had three son and a daughter: Edward L., Lester C., Elsa A. and Ernest R. The daughter Fannie is the wife of William J. Finley, and has eight children: Forest F., Eugenius W., Winnie, Nellie B., John H., Avery R., Grace D., and Bessie O. Mrs. Finley, like her mother, is also a correspondent of various newspapers, and has written for the Ladies' Home Journal and other publications besides the local press.

Edited 1 time‎(s)‎. Last edit at 01/23/2006 12:01PM by Connie Burkett.


View Notes for ...


Media
There are no media objects for this individual.
View Media for ...


Family with Parents
Father
Caleb B. Davis ‎(I1854)‎
Birth 24 February 1809 30 29 Monongalia County ‎(West)‎ Virginia
Death 13 May 1891 ‎(Age 82)‎ Mears, Oceana, Michigan, USA
3 years
Mother
 
Sarah Wagner ‎(I1855)‎
Birth 15 April 1812 Monongalia, West Virginia, USA
Death 1888 ‎(Age 75)‎ Michigan, USA

Marriage: 16 December 1831 -- Marion, West Virginia, USA
1 month
#1
Brother
Alpheus W. Davis ‎(I31184)‎
Birth about 1832 22 19
2 years
#2
Brother
Benjamin F. Davis ‎(I31185)‎
Birth about 1834 24 21
2 years
#3
Brother
Caleb B. Davis ‎(I31186)‎
Birth about 1836 26 23
2 years
#4
Sister
Hattie E. Davis ‎(I31188)‎
Birth about 1838 28 25
Death 21 October 1903 ‎(Age 65)‎
2 years
#5
Brother
Jacob J. Davis ‎(I31189)‎
Birth about 1840 30 27
2 years
#6
Brother
Josephus Davis ‎(I31190)‎
Birth about 1842 32 29
2 years
#7
Sister
Sarah E. Davis ‎(I31191)‎
Birth about 1844 34 31
-11 years
#8
Eugenius Wilson Davis ‎(I31187)‎
Birth 20 December 1832 23 20 Marion, Monongahela, West Virginia, USA
Death 22 April 1925 ‎(Age 92)‎ LaPorte, Indiana
Family with Betsey Ann Barnes
Eugenius Wilson Davis ‎(I31187)‎
Birth 20 December 1832 23 20 Marion, Monongahela, West Virginia, USA
Death 22 April 1925 ‎(Age 92)‎ LaPorte, Indiana
2 years
Wife
 
Betsey Ann Barnes ‎(I31680)‎
Birth 30 January 1835 Onondaga, New York, USA
Death 21 December 1919 ‎(Age 84)‎

Marriage: 9 October 1853
15 months
#1
Son
Arthur C. Davis ‎(I31682)‎
Birth 31 December 1854 22 19
Death 23 January 1896 ‎(Age 41)‎
7 years
#2
Daughter
Frances E. Davis ‎(I31683)‎
Birth about 1862 29 26